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Child Abuse, Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Stalking, Human Trafficking, Teen and Dating violence and Domestic Violence Related Murder, Suicide, Bullying and Animal Cruelty!
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Animal Cruelty

Animal Cruelty

Many studies in psychology, sociology, and criminology during the last 25 years have demonstrated that violent offenders frequently have childhood and adolescent histories of serious and repeated animal cruelty. The FBI has recognized the connection since the 1970s, when its analysis of the lives of serial killers suggested that most had killed or tortured animals as children.

Other research has shown consistent patterns of animal cruelty among perpetrators of more common forms of violence, including child abuse, spouse abuse, and elder abuse. In fact, the American Psychiatric Association considers animal cruelty one of the diagnostic criteria of conduct disorder.

How is Animal Abuse Related to Domestic Violence?  

In recent years, a strong connection has been documented linking animal abuse and domestic violence. A New Jersey study found that in 88 percent of families where there had been physical abuse of children, there were also records of animal abuse. In Wisconsin, battered women revealed that in four out of five cases, abusive partners had also been violent toward pets or livestock. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence conducted its own study in which 85.4 percent of women and 63.0 percent of children reported incidents of pet abuse after arriving at domestic violence shelters. Women who do seek safety at shelters are nearly 11 times more likely to report that their partner has hurt or killed their animals than women who have not experienced domestic abuse.

These numbers are too high. The Chicago Police Department's Domestic ViolenceProgram took a look at the criminal histories of animal fighting/animal abuse arrestees for 2000-2001 and found that approximately 30 percent had domestic violence charges on their records. There is legitimate evidence that the individuals involved in violent acts against animals present a danger to the public that must be addressed. Intentional animal abuse is often seen in association with other serious crimes including drug offenses, gang activity,weapons violations, sexual assault and domestic violence—and can be one of the most visible parts of an entire history of aggressive or antisocial behavior.

http://www.americanhumane.org/interaction/support-the-bond/fact-sheets/animal-abuse-domestic-violence.html

http://www.animaltherapy.net/animal%20abuse.html

http://www.aspca.org/fight-animal-cruelty/domestic-violence-and-animal-cruelty.aspx


What Can Victim Advocates and Domestic Violence Shelters Do?

Work with victims to be sure they include pets in their safety planning.

Include questions about any threats or injuries to pets on your intake questionnaires.

Work with legislators to insure that pets can be included in orders of protection and educate judges about the necessity to do so.

Work with your local humane organizations or animal control to establish programs for the emergency housing of pets coming from homes experiencing violence.